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Shop our signed Genie Bouchard tennis gear with autographs on a variety of items by the Wimbledon winner. Signed Genie Bouchard shirts, balls, racquets, tennis balls and caps. All with Certificate of Authenticity, free UK delivery & Worldwide shipping. Many with photo proof!

SIGNED GENIE BOUCHARD TENNIS MEMORABILIA


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Eugenie ‘Genie’ Bouchard is a professional Canadian tennis player.  Genie was born in 1994 in Canada, who now lives in Miami.  She was the first Canadian-born player to reach a grand-slam singles tournament final.  She reached the final of the Wimbledon Championships in 2014, eventually losing to Petra Kvitova.  She had a good year in 2014 and also reached the semi-finals of the Australian Open and French Open.  Bouchard was named the WTA Most Improved Player in 2014.  She reached her highest World Ranking of No 5, a record for any Canadian tennis plater.

Bouchard starting playing tennis aged just 5.  She was a member of Tennis Canada’s National Training Centre, based in Montreal.  Bouchard moved to Florida at the age of 12 with her mum.  She would later return to Montreal for training three years later.  Her playing style is fairly aggressive and high-risk.  She has a powerful groundstroke which she often employs at the baseline of the court.  This playing style allowed her to beat many top 10 players.  She refused to adapt her style which many believe led to her demise.

Genie was known for a lawsuit against the United States Tennis Association.  She suffered a fall in the women’s locker room, in the physio room.  She fell and hit her head hard on the tiled floor.  As a result, this led to concussion and withdrawal from the doubles tournament.  The jury ruled Bouchard was responsible for 25% of the total negligence.  This meant the USTA were to pay 75% of the damages owed.  Bouchard and USTA reached a confidential settlement.